Language of Flowers

Language of Flowers

Nature

A profound source of inspiration and joy, flowers are at the heart of our creations, keep us company at our workspaces, and are an everyday celebration at our stores.

“I must have flowers, always, and always.”
― Claude Monet

Integral to our design DNA, motifs of blooming flowers appear abundantly across our textiles, tableware, apparel, and other products. ‘Language of Flowers’ is an ongoing series expressing our fondness for flowers, especially those that immensely delight us and fuel our imagination and thoughts. Through a series of posts and stories we introduce you to our favourite blooms – from our repertoire of timeless Mughal florals to exotic island flora and signature Good Earth flowers like the desi Gulab, Rajnigandha and Mogra amongst others. 
 
For Part I of this campaign, we bring you a selection of our 6 most loved wild flowers that carpet the Himalayas at this time of the year – which were also the design inspiration for our Spring’20 collection. 

RHODODENDRON (Rhododendron arboreum)

The radiant Rhododendrons are known to herald the onset of Spring in the Himalayas, blooming in joyous profusion commonly in shades of red and white, but also pink and purple, and sometimes orange and yellow. The name is derived from the Greek words, ‘rhodon’ meaning rose and ‘dendron’ meaning tree. And yet, a rose by any other name…isn’t a rose! 

HIMALAYAN WILD ROSE (Rosa brunonii) 

A pride of the Himalayas, these delicate blossoms in pink and white cloak the valleys in late spring and are a sight for the eyes. 
 
Also known as Himalayan musk rose, it has an intoxicating fragrance and its tiny red fruit, the rosehip is widely used in teas and oils for its calming, detoxifying properties and other nutritional benefits. 

HIMALAYAN HONEYSUCKLE (Leycesteria formosa) 

The Queen of Himalayan Flowers, it draws us with its striking shade of blue and the delicate crepe-like texture like that of regular poppies. The Valley of Flowers and Hemkund Sahib treks in Uttarakhand offer spectacular sights of beautiful Blue Poppies in all their springtime glory. 

HIMALAYAN BLUE POPPY (Meconopsis baileyi)

Next up in the ‘Language of Flowers’ series is The Queen of Himalayan Flowers. It draws us with its striking shade of blue and the delicate crepe-like texture like that of regular poppies. The Valley of Flowers and Hemkund Sahib treks in Uttarakhand offer spectacular sights of beautiful Blue Poppies in all their springtime glory. 

MAGNOLIA (Magnolia campbellii, Magnolia champaca)

We bring you Magnolias in all their magnificence. Named after a 17th century French botanist, Pierre Magnol, two of its popular varieties – Magnolia campbellii with its soft cream or white petals and Magnolia champaca (also, known as the Himalayan champaca) in shades of yellow-orange, bloom in abundance in the mountain valleys, bringing renewed joy each spring. The Champacas, which also grow in the southern part of the country, are used for worship at temples or worn in hair by women. The fragrant flower was also a prominent motif in our Annual Design Collection 2019-20, Maladvipa.

BALSAM (Impatiens glandulifera) 

Himalayan Balsam, Indian Balsam, Rose Balsam, Gul Mehndi…just some names for these bright pink blossoms that are native to the Himalayas, flowering majorly in Kashmir and Uttarakhand in altitudes between 2000-2500 metres with some exceptional discoveries at 4000 metres too. Their origin in the mighty mountains earned them the moniker of ‘Kiss-me-on-the-mountain’ while their hooded shape has been compared to a policeman’s helmet.